Original Article

Bisphenol A Exposure On Exclusively Breastfed Infants In Lactating Women: An Observational Cross-Sectional Study

10.4274/jcrpe.galenos.2021.2020.0305

  • Seda Çiftçi
  • Sıddıka Songül Yalçın
  • Gülhan Samur

Received Date: 14.12.2020 Accepted Date: 25.02.2021 J Clin Res Pediatr Endocrinol 0;0(0):0-0 [e-Pub] PMID: 33749218

Objective:

Bisphenol A exposure is crucial for lactating women and exclusively breastfed infants. Bisphenol A transfers directly by breastfeeding and may cause adverse health outcomes. We conduct this study to determine maternal human milk bisphenol A level and exclusively breastfed infants' bisphenol A exposure. We investigated the effect of exposure according to participants' nutritional habits.

Methods:

We enrolled voluntarily, healthy postnatal, exclusively breastfeeding women (n=80) and collected hindmilk samples. Human milk-free bisphenol A concentration was analyzed using a competitive ELISA method. Free (unconjugated) BPA has been detected in human samples indicating that humans are internally exposed to estrogenically active BPA. Participants' demographic properties, nutritional habits were questioned with an elaborated survey face-to-face by the researcher.

Results:

Human milk median free bisphenol A level is 0.63 µg/L. There was no statistically significant association between maternal body mass index, birth type, parity, infant birth week, infant birth weight, and human milk bisphenol A concentration. Nevertheless, we only found a statistically significant association between human milk bisphenol A level and fast-food, carbonated drinks consumption (p=0.022 and p=0.018, respectively). Exclusively breastfed infants' bisphenol A exposure was 0.0099±0.0079 µg/kg bw/day. There was a negative moderate statistically significant correlation between infant bisphenol A exposure and infant current body weight (r= 0.327, p=0.003).

Conclusion:

Exclusively breastfed infants bisphenol A exposure was under the tolerable bisphenol A level (4 µg/kg bw/day), and infants' current dietary exposure level was safe.

Keywords: Bisphenol A, Breastfeeding, Exposure, Lactation, Maternal Exposure